Deportation Defense

Global Justice Law Group provides high-quality legal representation for foreign nationals who face deportation (or “removal”) from the United States.

There are several different reasons why you may be ordered deported.  It is important to understand these grounds of deportation so that you can protect your ability to stay in the United States.

If you receive a Notice to Appear at the immigration court, call or email Global Justice Law Group as soon as possible to find out what options you may have to get out of detention, defend yourself against deportation, and possibly get legal status in the United States.

Available forms of relief from removal depend on many factors, such as whether you are a legal permanent resident, whether you committed a crime, the length of time you have been in the U.S., and other factors.

The following is a list of common types of relief:

  • Cancellation of Removal for Non-Lawful Permanent Residents (also called “Ten Year Cancellation”): requires ten years continuous physical presence in the U.S., good moral character, no convictions for certain crimes, and a showing of hardship to a spouse, parent or child who is a United States Citizen or a Lawful Permanent Resident

  • Cancellation of Removal for Battered Spouses or Children: requires three years continuous physical presence in the U.S., good moral character, no convictions for certain crimes, a showing of hardship to the applicant or his/her child or parent, and a showing that the applicant or his/her child has been battered or subjected to extreme cruelty by a U.S. Citizen or Lawful Permanent Resident spouse or parent.

  • Suspension of Deportation: for those proceeding under laws in place prior to April 1, 1997; must show seven years continuous physical presence, good moral character and extreme hardship to self and/or a spouse, parent or child who is a United States Citizen or Lawful Permanent Resident.

  • Cancellation of Removal for Lawful Permanent Residents: requires five years lawful permanent resident status, seven years residency in the U.S., and no convictions for aggravated felony crimes.

  • Adjustment of Status to Permanent Residence: requires an approved and current petition for a green card; other accompanying forms are required; applicant must not be ineligible for a green card due to other reasons (e.g., criminal record).

  • NACARA relief: for certain persons from Nicaragua, Cuba, El Salvador, Guatemala, and former Soviet Bloc countries.

  • Asylum: requires a showing of past persecution, or a well-founded fear of future persecution, on account of race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group, or political opinion.

  • Withholding of Removal: under INA section 241(b)(3), requires showing a likelihood of future persecution on account of race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group, or political opinion.

  • Withholding of Removal under the Convention Against Torture: requires showing a likelihood of torture (inflicted either upon applicant or certain third persons) committed by anyone, with acquiescence of the government.

  • Waivers: may be available for select offenses that render a person removable.  Eligibility for relief often depends on the applicant’s criminal record or other discretionary factors the Immigration Judge may consider.

Applications for relief must be well-documented, and organized in a manner to present the case as favorably as possible. Experienced lawyers should be consulted to make your case as strong as possible.  Contact Global Justice Law Group to discuss your case and request a consultation.

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